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What is the difference in meaning between the following sentences?

I have known her since I lived in the street.

I have known her since I have lived in the street.

In Swan's 4th edition of English Usage it is said that "since" can be used as a conjunction of time, introducing its own clause.The tense in the since-clause can be perfect or past, depending on the meaning.

I cannot see any difference in the sentence above. I cannot see the difference between the following sentences either.

We visit my parents every week since we bought the car.

We visit my parents every week since we’ve had the car.

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I have known her since I lived there

I have known her since I have lived there.

The first sentence means that you are not living there but you have known her since the days of your living there.

The second may mean that you are living there and you have known her since you started living there.

We visit our parents every week since we bought the car

We visit our parents every week since we have had the car

In the first and the second sentence it is clear that you have the car with you because of the definite article the

There is no difference between the two sentences.

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