1

enter image description here

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/okey-doke


  1. If "okey dokey", "okey-dokey", or "okey-doke" just mean okay, then I wonder where the "doke(y)" comes from and what it originally means?

  2. Can I use it in this way?
    A: Do you agree with her idea, or not?
    B: Okey dokey

10

This is called "reduplication" and rhyming reduplication is quite common casual English "super-duper, easy-peasy" The word "dokey" is just a modified version of "okay" with an arbitary "d" attached to it.

The existence of "hokey-pokey" probably influenced the reduplication of okay to okey-dokey

In terms of meaning it is just a very casual and silly form of "okay". You can't reply to "Do you agree, or not?" with "Okay". You need "Yes" or "No". (I suppose you could say "Okay, I agree".) "Okey-dokey" is silly talk, unless you are being deliberately silly, I'd suggest not using it at all.

"Okay" and "Okey-dokey" can be used to indicate agreement to an instruction, not to a question:

Wash the dishes!

Okey-dokey, I'll get right on that.

11
  • Thank you James for the fun and interesting information. It's new to me. As for "You can't reply to "Do you agree, or not?" with "Okay"", that's actually what I expected, but I was curious because the definition I saw in Longman Dictionary says "used to show that you agree with someone or give permission for someone to do something". I thought that it meant "Okey dokey" itself already includes the meaning "I agree". – Takashi Jul 28 '20 at 9:21
  • 2
    I have always heard 'okey-dokey' used to indicate understanding or compliance, in situations where "OK" might be used for that purpose (only). E.g. I'll see you at 2 PM - Okey-dokey. Lock the office after you leave - Okey dokey. I would not expect it to be used for all situations where "OK" is used, e.g. I am OK, the car is OK, that is OK, etc. – Michael Harvey Jul 28 '20 at 10:43
  • 2
    There are certain regions and dialects where you will hear adults non-ironically using "okey-doke" or some variant - usually very friendly, rural, informal places. I'd say in those contexts the spirit of the expression is more jolly than silly. For an ESL learner I would agree that it's best to just keep clear of this one. It's like learning cockney rhyming slang - it just doesn't do well on anyone but proper natives of that dialect, and just sounds affected and weird if anyone else tries it, including native English speakers who speak in other accents or dialects. – J... Jul 28 '20 at 18:50
  • 2
    @J... your addition is very spot on. I say "okay doke" all the time only because my mom also always said it :) Definitely not worth bothering to learn/incorporate into your vocabulary if it's not something you already say – HFBrowning Jul 28 '20 at 19:55
  • 1
    If one is immersed in a dialect to which he is not native, then he may naturally acquire features of it, without any problem. But studying expressions specific to a dialect, separate from direct contact with the population, is affected and unnatural, and may seem as though one seeks attention. An American who pretends that an English accent is his natural one is seen as distasteful. Mimicking African-American vernacular though not being native to it is seen as a soft racism. – epl Aug 2 '20 at 6:50
-2

Okey dokey is kinda Old School...

Why not try, "Aye Aye Captain!" instead?

It has the same thought that you agreed, while showing the other side of your Humor.

or you can also used; "Sounds like a plan." to confidently express that you're down whatever they would like to do. It's way more professional and sounds cooler than; (Yes, Master! / I obey / as you wish / and R.O.G.E.R. that!-which stands for Received Order Given, Expect Results -I've just once wonder who the hell is ROGER? haha so I find out it was an Acronym)

Simply saying "Sounds like a plan." in response to orders, objectives or commands - will give more impact that you somehow appreciate their idea to deal with specific things. (While playing safe and not to be blame with the accountability when it fails, because you simply obey to and do what they want. haha!)

5
  • Thanks, Mickhael. Is "Aye Aye Captain!" better? Is "okey dokey" a bit too old? English is really fun. I love English. – Takashi Jul 28 '20 at 9:30
  • or you can also used; "Sounds like a plan." to confidently express that you're down whatever they would like to do. It's way more professional and sounds cooler than; (Yes, Master! / I obey / as you wish / and R.O.G.E.R. that! -which stands for Received Order Given, Expect Results -I've just once wonder who the hell is ROGER? haha so I find out it was an Acronym) – Mickhael Chua Bajandi Jul 28 '20 at 9:55
  • Simply saying "Sounds like a plan." in response to orders, objectives or commands - will give more impact that you somehow appreciate their idea to deal with specific things. (While playing safe and not to be blame with the accountability when it fails, because you simply obey to and do what they want. haha! – Mickhael Chua Bajandi Jul 28 '20 at 9:56
  • 6
    Treat the above answer and comments with caution. – Michael Harvey Jul 28 '20 at 11:02
  • @MichaelHarvey I mean no harm and would just like to provide additional information on how to deliver a message in another way around. Cheers mate! – Mickhael Chua Bajandi Jul 28 '20 at 11:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.