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How are these sentences usually joined using "and"?

  • I am from Asia. I am an English language learner.
    • Is "I am from Asia and am an English language learner" correct?
  • You are from Asia. You are an English language learner.
    • Is "You are from Asia and are an English language learner." correct?
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    The sequence of words and am an English is difficult to pronounce. Few English language speakers would use it. Although you could use the constructions you suggest, they are not idiomatic. Much simpler and more natural would be: I am from Asia and I'm learning English Or, less likely: I'm learning English and I'm from Asia. Mar 30 at 14:59
  • Ok, thanks. But how do you join it without repeating the pronoun "I"?
    – Vis M
    Mar 30 at 15:01
  • They appear to be correct. You can omit or repeat the pronoun: "I am from Asia and I am an English language learner." "You are from Asia and you are an English language learner." It is probably more common to omit the repeated pronoun, but it is not required.
    – user8356
    Mar 30 at 15:01
  • @RonaldSole I think you should post your comment as an answer. It's better than mine. In your suggested rewrites changing the order changes the emphasis. Mar 30 at 15:02
  • It's true that contestants on University Challenge usually introduce themselves as I am [name] from [hometown] and I'm studying [subject], but I am from Asia and [I] am an English language learner does sound a bit "robotic" to me. More naturally, perhaps, I am an English language learner from Asia. Mar 30 at 15:22
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The sequence of words and am an English is difficult to pronounce.

Few English language speakers would use it.

Although you could use the constructions you suggest, they are not idiomatic.

Much simpler and more natural would be:

I am from Asia and I'm learning English
Or, less likely:
I'm learning English and I'm from Asia.

Another possibility - with acknowledgement to FumbleFingers:

I am an English language learner from Asia.

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Both rewritings are correct. You could leave out the second "am" in the single sentences.

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