1

I have not eaten macaroons in a long time.

It has been quite a long time since I've eaten macaroons.

I haven been a long time no eaten macaroons.

Which is the colloquial way to say?

2

I have not eaten macaroons in a long time.

My preferred form.

It has been quite a long time since I've eaten macaroons.

I would remove the plural from this second one & recast it as

It has been quite a long time since I ate a macaroon

which would then make it quite OK.

This last one makes no sense at all

I haven been a long time no eaten macaroons.

| improve this answer | |
  • +1 You could also have I've gone a long time now without having a macaroon – Araucaria - Not here any more. Nov 15 '14 at 20:43
  • 1
    As for #2, I'd use a contraction and omit the quite, i.e.: It's been a long time since I've had a macaroon. – J.R. Nov 16 '14 at 0:13
  • 1
    Or in teen-speak: I haven't had a macaroon in, like, forever. – Jim Nov 16 '14 at 2:21
  • "I've not had one for yonks" ;-) – gone fishin' again. Nov 16 '14 at 8:02
4

In England you would probably hear:

'I haven't had macaroons in ages.' or: 'I've not had macaroons in ages.'
'It's been ages since I've had macaroons.'

| improve this answer | |
  • You'd also hear 'for ages' in the first two. – tunny Nov 15 '14 at 19:58

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