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Could you let me know what mean these two sentences. Are they equal in terms of meaning ?

Next holiday we're staying in a five-star hotel. (the reservation has been made) Next holiday we will be staying in a five-star hotel.

In that case does it mean the reservation has been made

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The present progressive can refer to future events (as can the simple present), but it's usually more immediate/certain than the future progressive (or simple future).

The present progressive (in your example) might imply the reservation has been made compared to future progressive, but it mostly implies that the plan ("staying in a five-start hotel") is more certain; it's the present plan, so it's stronger than the intention implied by using the future.

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They mean the same.

The words next holiday identify the time period you are talking about (clearly in the future), so it doesn't matter if you use will or not.

This isn't true for the past - I am going to the park yesterday does not work.

To ensure maximum clarity, use will.

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Those sentences pretty much mean the same: the intent is to stay in a good hotel, next holiday. The tone of voice, emphasis placed on words, and context of the conversation would give the cues on whether the reservation has been made -- or whether the speaker is informing someone else that "this reservation must be made or I will be very angry."

For example, as we leave the hotel that was far away from the convention we were attending (which was in another hotel), I tell my husband, "Next year, we will be staying in the convention hotel!" The reservation has not been made, but he knows that it better get made as soon as possible, or I am going to fuss at him a lot!

Later, if I am calmly telling a friend, "Next year, we will be staying in the convention hotel," my tone of voice (and lack of emphasis) indicates that I have no doubts about this, which would imply that the reservation has been made.

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