0

This is from the TV series House M.D.

Cameron: He got you to us.

Marina: He never gave up, no matter what happened. He kept saying to me don't worry, we will make it, I will take care of you. He refuses to worry or pray, he believes if you don't have one, you don't need the other.

The actual transcript:

Marina: He never gave up, no matter what happen [sic], he kept saying to me don't worry, we will make it, I take [sic] care of you. He refuses to worry or pray, he believe [sic] if you don't have one, you don't need the other.

4

It refers to the to worry or pray. One refers to worry and the other to pray.

What he means with that is that if you do not have worries, you do not need to pray. He refuses to worry, which means that he does not have any worries and that he has no need for prayers.

  • 1
    The text as originally cited was obviously somewhat inaccurate, and we have no link to the full original context, but since I assume the script was written by competent native speaker I think it's an unlikely juxtaposition. The initial references are to verbs (to worry, to pray), so it seems clumsy in the extreme to couple these with a "stock phrase" that specifically depends on referencing nouns (which in this case strongly implies pluralising a worry as well as transparently converting from to pray to prayer). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Jun 17 '15 at 14:36
  • 2
    The quote is from the episode Human Error, and the character Marina and her husband are Cuban, so the script writers may be deliberating using phrasing that a native English speaker wouldn't use. – ssav Jun 17 '15 at 15:00
  • @FumbleFingers- I took the nouns to be worry, and prayer. – Jim Jun 18 '15 at 2:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.