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Did you woke up this morning and looked at the mirror, and notice the eye bags are puffer than ever?

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    What follows after do/does/did is an infinitive, not present tense. – rogermue Jul 22 '15 at 1:05
  • You seem to learn English without a grammar, which is a systematic introduction into the system of a language. You should try to find a grammar for beginners. Public libraries often have such things. – rogermue Jul 22 '15 at 5:19
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Do is the tensed verb in this construction, and it takes an infinitive. For all verbs except be this is the same form as the uninflected present, so

Did you wake up this morning and
              look in the mirror and
              notice your eyebags are puffier than ever?

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StoneyB has given the right answer—it is neither the past tense nor the present tense, but the bare infinitive that follows.

However, this might be a little confusing, because with a second person subject, the infinitive looks the same as the present tense! So how can we tell the difference?

Let's change the subject from you to he. With a third person singular subject, the infinitive and present tense look different:

Did he 
  wake up this morning and
  look in the mirror and
  notice his eyebags are puffier than ever? 

Notice how it says wake, look, and notice. These are the infinitive forms. If you tried to use the present tense, it would be ungrammatical:

Did he 
  *wakes up this morning and
  *looks in the mirror and
  *notices his eyebags are puffier than ever? 

Why does this happen? Well, let's break this down:

1a. He woke up this morning.
1b. He looked in the mirror.
1c. He noticed his eyebags are puffier than ever.

In each case, the first (and only) verb in the main clause is past tense. That's fine, but we'd like to turn these sentences into questions, and in order to do that, we need an auxiliary verb. Let's add the dummy auxiliary do:

2a. He did wake up this morning.
2b. He did look in the mirror.
2c. He did notice his eyebags are puffier than ever.

Now each main clause has two verbs: did wake, did look, and did notice. But as you can see, the second verb is no longer marked for tense! In each case, the verb following do appears in its bare infinitive form.

In all three sentences, the tensed verb is did. Having both verbs tensed would be ungrammatical, and that's true whether we put the second verb in past or present tense:

Past tense

3a. He did *woke up this morning.
3b. He did *looked in the mirror.
3c. He did *noticed his eyebags are puffier than ever.

Present tense

4a. He did *wakes up this morning.
4b. He did *looks in the mirror.
4c. He did *notices his eyebags are puffier than ever.

All of the examples in 3a-c and 4a-c are ungrammatical.

But the sentences we made earlier in 2a-2c are fine. Let's take them and turn them into questions by swapping the subject he with the auxiliary did:

2a. He did wake up this morning.
2b. He did look in the mirror.
2c. He did notice his eyebags are puffier than ever.

 ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓

5a. Did he wake up this morning?
5b. Did he look in the mirror?
5c. Did he notice his eyebags are puffier than ever?

One last thing. We'll join these sentences together with and:

    Did he wake up this morning
and did he look in the mirror
and did he notice his eyebags are puffier than ever?

And now we've got your sentence, pretty much.


Except if the verb is be or defective.

In this answer, the * symbol marks a verb form as ungrammatical.

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You want to use present tense if you were asking.

'Did you wake up this morning and look in the mirror and notice your eyebags were bigger then ever?

But if you were stating this then you would say it in past tense.

'I woke up this morning and looked in the mirror and noticed my eyebags are bigger then ever.

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