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What is the common term for the word "menstruation"?

Can I use cyclus?

In my native language, we normally say it by "monthly guest".

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    The word "Period" ? Feb 1, 2016 at 2:19
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    @GhaithA - I think that's it, period. :^)
    – J.R.
    Feb 1, 2016 at 2:29
  • I saw once: someone's on the rag.
    – Schwale
    Feb 1, 2016 at 3:12
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    A) a "cycle" (not "cyclus") describes always the whole repeating time span, in this case from one bleeding to the next. B) if you need something else than "period", describe the register: a euphemism you could use with your elderly aunt? A slang term used by boys talking about girls? .... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menstruation / en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menstrual_taboo#United_States
    – Stephie
    Feb 1, 2016 at 6:32

3 Answers 3

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Cyclus isn't a common term. I never heard that word before this question.

If the context is medical you should use menstruate.

Period is the common term. One who is menstruating is said to be on her period. A less direct/somewhat more polite term is time of the month - e.g. It's that time of the month for me ..., Is it that time of the month?

On the rag is a (at least AmE) slang term - not vulgar but nowhere near polite. Often condescending in meaning unless females themselves use the term to express frustration.

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    Never heard on her period but have heard having her period, "she's having her period", "I'm having my period". Have also heard monthly cycle, had a Russian friend who called it her red days. Indirectly, having cramps may be a sign of menstruation.
    – Peter
    Feb 7, 2016 at 13:33
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    I would consider on the rag to be vulgar at best and I'd strongly advise against using it.
    – divibisan
    Aug 20, 2018 at 16:25
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The very popular term in India is "She has MC" meaning Menstruation cycle.Or, ''the aunt has come!"

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    In France, apparently, it is often called "having the English to stay". May 1, 2019 at 16:23
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In the UK:
Decoraters in (as in painting) / Aunt Flo is visiting / On the Blob / On / On the rag

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