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  1. I hate how people think they can do whatever they want.

  2. I hate it, how people think they can do whatever they want.

  3. I hate it how people they think they can do whatever they want.

Which of the above sentences are grammatically correct? What's the difference between the sentences mentioned above?

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All three of your sentences have the same meaning and the the main difference is stylistic.

If anything, using it may emphasize what you are saying since a slight pause would occur after the it especially when signalled with a ','(comma).

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It there is known by several names, among them "dummy it". It is a placeholder that refers to the state of affairs that will be expressed by the following clause which completes the meaning of the predication.

I hate it when the press reports on politics as if it were a sport.

It is like a delegate in programming.

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  • I hate when the press reports on politics as if it were a sport. If you had used this sentence as an example instead of the one you used, it would have still been correct, right? – lekon chekon Feb 22 '16 at 18:09
  • "I hate when" is not ungrammatical, but neither is it perfectly idiomatic. Although we do say "I hate when that happens!" here we'd probably say "I hate how the press..." – Tᴚoɯɐuo Feb 22 '16 at 18:12

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