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I've used the "join a group of people to do [something]" structure in the following sentence:

I was invited to join a team of three other engineers to develop a knowledge-based system for neuromuscular disorders.

Is the sentence grammatically correct? What I mean is that I was invited to join a team of three other engineers and our task was to develop a knowledge-based system for neuromuscular disorders.

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    Perfectly correct. This is using "to" in the sense "in order to". – JavaLatte Mar 20 '16 at 13:58
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    You probably don't need "other", since it is implied in context (you are joining them). – user3169 Mar 20 '16 at 20:40
  • I would keep the 'other'. While technically user3169 is correct, people are often not that explicit with their words. A 'team of three' may not have three actual people but three positions for people. He could be the third person, making it total three. – drynyn Mar 21 '16 at 12:02
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It is grammatically correct and reads fine.

Was there a particular part that you were worried about?

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  • I was worried about the "join a group of people to do [something]" structure. – zoftvare Mar 21 '16 at 17:08

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