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Ambition is indispensable for both individuals and the society. Without the ambition of pursuing success, people may feel empty and meaningless in their lives, and it will be hard for the society to make any progress.

Is

... it will be hard for the society to make any progress

correct?

I am not sure whether it is because society is not a person, so I am not sure whether I can use make progress after it.

Thank you!

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    A person is not required as the subject of the verb make. Please ask a specific question about usage; you are more likely to receive a useful answer if you do. We can't serve as a rewrite desk, though! – P. E. Dant Aug 12 '16 at 6:55
  • Thanks for the comment, the question is: is '… it will be hard for the society to make any progress' correct? – EmmaXL Aug 12 '16 at 7:02
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    Yes. It is correct. – P. E. Dant Aug 12 '16 at 8:22
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    @Emma, we do have ambition, so if you hypothesize about not having it, you should use would rather than will. For example, "Without the ambition... it would be hard for society to make any progress". Arguably, you should also use might rather than may, – JavaLatte Aug 12 '16 at 18:00
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As mentioned by @PEDant, "society" and "make progress" can be associated without any problem.


As mentioned by @JavaLatte, may and will must match. So you can say:

people will feel empty... and it will be hard for the society...

or:

people may feel empty... and it would be hard for the society...

I cannot guarantee if might is more suitable than may in the sentence above.


However, I think that the most correct way to tell it is:

people would feel empty... and it would be hard for the society...

or:

people might feel empty... and it might be hard for the society...

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