1

I have two examples:

If you do try to discuss these new beliefs with them, many of whose minds are closed to new ideas will fight hard to keep themselves convinced and even try to change your mind back as well

and

If you do try to discuss these new beliefs with them, many whose minds are closed to new ideas will fight hard to keep themselves convinced and even try to change your mind back as well.

What is the difference between "many of whose" and "many whose"? Do they have the same meaning and can they be interchangeable?

  • They both are correct, and bear the same meaning. But of course, they are not the same structure. – Man_From_India Oct 30 '16 at 13:32
-1

Your sentences are describing a smaller group of a general population, one way it can be said is

some of a population
many of a population
a few of a population all of a population

another way this can be said is to just mention the quantity directly

many something
some something
a few something
all somethings

Both of your sentences are correct.

  • I don't understand how the first sentence is correct. Can you explain it to me? – sumelic Jan 7 '17 at 4:01
  • "Some of the population"? – Peter Jan 7 '17 at 7:57
  • The first sentence in the original post. "If you do try to discuss these new beliefs with them, many of whose minds are closed to new ideas will fight hard to keep themselves convinced and even try to change your mind back as well." I can't figure out a grammatical parse of it. – sumelic Jan 7 '17 at 16:57

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