0

This is a great product, it does, however, come with some disadvantages.

I suppose saying "... but it isn't flawless" etc are equally fine but is there an idiom that could be used here?

  • By disadvantage, do you mean negative consequences it can bring about by user's consumption or an inherent defect in product? – Yuri Feb 25 '17 at 7:55
  • inherent defect – ChadThunder Feb 25 '17 at 8:07
  • 1
    Then I wouldn't buy that product since it's defective, and faulty, or even broken. :-( Some people call it a piece of junk or sometimes a lemon. However, since you say the product is great I'd suggest however, imperfection is inevitable. – Yuri Feb 25 '17 at 8:13
  • There is the idiom "curate's egg" meaning 'something that is partly good but mainly bad'. But it can hardly meet advertising objectives. – Yulia Feb 25 '17 at 15:06
2

I guess, you can use the idiom "pros and cons" in this context.

This is a great product, it does, however, has its own "pros and cons".

Pros and cons

0

"This is a great product, but every bean has its black..."

  • "But there are spots even on the sun" isn't an idiom I'm familiar with, as a native speaker. I'm not sure I'd understand what it means. Some explanation would definitely improve your answer. – David Richerby Feb 25 '17 at 16:49
  • "But every bean has its black" isn't an idiom I'm familiar with, as a native speaker. I'm not sure I'd understand what it means. Some explanation would definitely improve your answer. – David Richerby Feb 25 '17 at 17:20
  • @David Richerby: Interesting. I was sure that it's an English proverb which coincides with the Russian one word for word. So the English equivalent is "Every bean has its black". I've corrected my previous post, thank you for pointing it out. – Yulia Feb 25 '17 at 17:22
  • It means that everything has its disadvantages. "Ye hae had your ain time o't, Mr. Syddall: but ilka [every] bean has its black and ilka path has its puddle... and it will just set you henceforth to sit at the board end as weel as it did Andrew lang syne." (W. Scott, ‘Rob Roy’ ch. XXXVIII) – Yulia Feb 25 '17 at 17:27
  • Judging by Ngram Viewer and Google books search results, "every bean has its black", even if once it was in use, nowadays seems to be rather outdated. – Rompey Feb 25 '17 at 18:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.