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I think the two sentences has the same goal I am aiming for.

but which one has strong meaning

Software has become a vital component of the infrastructure supporting our everyday life.

vs

Software becomes a vital component of the infrastructure supporting our everyday life.

due to the fact that :

Present simple is used to describe a fact ! this is a fact? isn't it ?

present perfect is used to describe a continuity or state of continuity ?

We're not sure when the sharp increasing of software will stop.

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  • Whether or not software will assume still more importance, it has already become a vital component of the infrastructure supporting our everyday life. Nov 8, 2017 at 16:30
  • @MvLog You mean using perfect is the best choose here or you've just rephrase what I said! Nov 8, 2017 at 16:42
  • 2
    choice Yes, it's better, the present simple would imply just an ongoing process with an uncertain outcome. Nov 8, 2017 at 16:46
  • choice , of course , thank you ... I think " imply just an ongoing process with an uncertain outcome" is a part of present perfect definition. Nov 8, 2017 at 16:49
  • No, the present perfect tense expresses action or state completed at the time of speaking. Nov 8, 2017 at 16:55

1 Answer 1

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You would want to say

Software is becoming...

Software has become...

depending on your meaning. The present perfect implies that it has attained that status, where the ongoing says only that it is on its way to do so.

In this context, "software becomes" is not idiomatic to describe a general truth, though it can be used to describe a specific or qualified truth, for example:

Software becomes an indispensable component of everyday life. unidiomatic

Software becomes an indispensable component of everyday life when we no longer know how to complete an important task without using it. idiomatic

Software is becoming an indispensable component of everyday life. idiomatic

Software has become an indispensable component of everyday life. idiomatic

The tea gets cold. unidiomatic, as is, without further licensing context, explicit in the statement or implicit in the conversation; for example, What happens when you leave a cup of tea on the windowsill? The tea gets cold.

The tea is getting cold. idiomatic

Even the hottest tea gets cold eventually. idiomatic

The tea gets cold quickly when you open the kitchen window and let the winter air in. idiomatic

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