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I wrote this myself, and I am not sure about the usage of "Whenever ... So ...". Do I need to make any changes to make my sentences grammatical?

I think she is a good friend and she has lots of information about everything. Whenever every person need help, she can help them because she want to learn everything that know about it to others. So I am happy because I have a good friend in my life. When I have any problem I can ask her and she guides me. I think good friend is very effective in personal life to everybody.

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There is no relationship between whenever and so in your quoted text; they do not constitute a correlative conjunction like not only / but also or neither / nor. Whether or not the usage of one is correct is independent of whether the usage of the other is correct here.

Whenever is suitable, although every person means all persons at once, so I think you mean whenever any person rather than whenever every person.

So is also fine. While some frown upon using a coordinating conjunction to start a sentence, such usage is not grammatically incorrect. The concern is not to overuse them in that position, as they can become repetitive (as a child might write, We went to the zoo. And we saw monkeys. And a tiger yawned. And we ate ice cream.), but this is a question of style, not grammar.


Other parts of the passage do have issues. Independent clauses should be separated by commas or semicolons as appropriate, or they may read as a run-on sentence. Some sentences need changes for number agreement. It is also unclear what you mean by effective.

I think you are confusing learn and teach in the second sentence, but I believe a native speaker would be more likely to say a peer shares knowledge (wisdom, information, etc.) or gives advice (or advises) rather than teaches it, particularly when the knowledge is "life advice" as opposed to a technical skill. A friend might teach me how to ride a motorcycle or connect to a wireless network; the same friend might advise me about what to buy for a wedding gift or share which restaurants are the best value in a neighborhood.

To make the minimum changes for grammaticality and style for what I think you intend, I would propose

I think she is a good friend, and she has lots of information about everything. Whenever anyone needs help with something, she can help them, because she want to teach everything she knows about it to others. So I am happy, because I have a good friend in my life. When I have any problem, I can ask her, and she guides me. I think a good friend is very helpful to everybody's personal lives.

But to rewrite completely, to emphasize the goodness of your friend and your joy in friendship, I would propose something like the following:

I think she is a good friend. Whenever anyone needs help, she can help them— not only because she knows a lot about everything, but because she wants to share what she knows with others. When I have any kind of problem, I can ask her, and she will guide me. A good friend is helpful in everyday life, and I am happy to call her a good friend.

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There are a couple of problems here. I suggest:

I think she is a good friend and she has lots of information about everything. Whenever any person needs help, she can help them because she wants to learn everything and teach it to others. So I am happy because I have this good friend in my life. Whenever I have a problem I can ask her and she guides me. I think she is a good friend and is very effective in her personal life.

Namely:

You probably don't mean to say "every person" needs help, you mean "any person". I doubt that you mean that everyone in the world comes to her for help all at once. Rather, every now and then some person will come to her.

"Person" is singular and so takes a singular verb: "person needs", not "person need".

Similarly, "she" is singular and so takes a singular verb: "she wants".

I'm not sure what you meant by "to know about it to others". "To know" something is to have it in your own mind. You cannot "know" something "to others". Perhaps you mean that she "teaches it to others", or "wants to share her knowledge with others".

In "I think good friend is very effective", "good friend" is not a proper noun and so requires an article or one of the adjectives that can replace an article. In this case you could say "my good friend" or maybe "this good friend".

"... is very effective ... to everybody" doesn't make sense in this context. A tool or procedure could be "effective to everybody", or probably better, "effective FOR everybody". But a person can't be "effective to everybody". She could be "helpful to everybody", or she could be effective at doing such-and-such for everybody.

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There are many "errors" in OP's example text, so it's hard to know where to start. Essentially, the construction here is...

[statement A] so [statement B]
where [statement B] logically follows from [statement A], and can be equally well expressed by...
Because [statement A] [statement B]

Several other conjunctions can be used to express the same relationship (therefore, thus instead of so, since instead of because, etc.). And for the "opposite" relationship, we have...

[statement A] but [statement B]
where [statement B] apparently contradicts [statement A], which can also be expressed by...
Although [statement A] [statement B]


In all the above examples, [statement B] is often followed by a comma. But as discussed in this ELU question, some people don't like starting a new sentence with So/But [statement B]. Obviously I don't mind (since I've just done it), but I must admit it grates on me when someone actually starts an entire written text with So [some statement].

You rarely see a text starting with the word But, because it's confusing to see a "contrastive" conjunction with no preceding statement being alluded to. Logically, the same should apply with so, but certainly in spoken contexts a lot of people do this (it's a discourse marker that might sometimes mean something like in/because of the current circumstances, but is usually fairly meaningless).


We're only supposed to address one issue in one question here on ELL, so I'll ignore all the other ungrammatical/non-idiomatic aspects of the example text.

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