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What is an antonym of "luxurious laziness"? Here is the context:

Going to school by a 20-minute bicycle journey is [[antonym]], while going to school by a 15-minute motorcycle ride is luxurious laziness.

Why is it a luxurious laziness? Luxurious because a motorcycle is costly. Laziness because the time difference is almost insignificant, and by riding a bicycle you're also building up your health.

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Agreed with Andrew's answer, but let's say that you wanted to keep your original sentence structure for dramatic effect. Let's also change luxurious laziness to something that rolls off the tongue more easily. How about:

Going to school by a 20-minute bicycle journey is yeomanly industry, while going to school by a 15-minute motorcycle ride is indolent decadence.

Or let's break the sentence apart for comic effect, to communicate disbelief with a mocking or sarcastic tone:

Going to school by a 20-minute bicycle journey is yeomanly industry, but going to school by a 15-minute motorcycle ride? Why, that is indolent decadence.

OK, let's just drop all pretense and go all out with this thing!

"Going to school by a 20-minute bicycle journey is yeomanly industry," the overweening governor told the incredulous young man, "but going to school by a 15-minute motorcycle ride? Why, that, my boy, is indolent decadence. Back in my day we had to walk 15 miles in the snow each way and our shoes were made of bark!"

And with that scolding, the governor sauntered off to his limousine which awaited him. The Duchess of Yarmouth would not be kept waiting!

🙃

  • Wow! :D That's a great answer! (+1) – Gaurang Tandon Dec 24 '17 at 0:46
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I'm not sure I agree with you that riding a motorcycle counts as either luxury or laziness ... but, putting that aside. Both slothful and indolent mean "excessive laziness*.

He was an indolent child, used to laying in bed until well after noon, followed by a leisurely breakfast.

Antonyms are: energetic, industrious, diligent, studious, hard-working, etc.

His brother, however, was a diligent child, always rising before the dawn to study.

I'm not sure this quite fits your context, though. It sounds more like you want to say that, by riding a motorcycle, you're giving in to a desire not to work hard. In this case, "self-indulgent" fits:

Riding a bicycle to school every day is good exercise, while taking a motorcycle to go the same distance is simple self-indulgence.

  • Yes, "self-indulgent" correctly fits my intended meaning. This version is much better! Thanks (+1) – Gaurang Tandon Dec 23 '17 at 10:21

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