1

In the Cambridge Dictionary's article "the icing of the cake", the following example is given:

I was just content to see my daughter in such a stable relationship but a grandchild, that really was the icing on the cake.

Even after checking all meanings of "but" I cannot figure out which meaning of "but" is meant here. Rather it seems to me that the above example sentence is noted wrongly, and the right notation should be:

I was just content to see my daughter in such a stable relationship.
But a grandchild (=having a grandchild, moreover), that really was the icing on the cake.

Is my assumption right/wrong?

2

"I was just content" in this context implies that the writer might not dare for more than their daughter being in such a stable relationship, but the "but" says they got more in the form of a grandchild, which was the icing on the cake i.e. something that elevated an already positive situation.

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  • So, was I right assuming that "but" is not a conjunction in the expression "(such) a stable relationship but a grandchild" but a conjunction in the greater sentence structure: "I was just content... but a grandchild (makes me even more content) ... was the icing on the cake"? – Min-Soo Pipefeet Dec 26 '17 at 9:15
  • Yes you have understood it correctly. – John Davis Dec 26 '17 at 10:15

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