2

This one with since is fine.

The situation has become worse since [the last accident/that meeting/the breakdown].

But if we use after, can it still be grammatical? if so, is it okay, awkward, etc.

The situation has become worse after [the last accident/that meeting].

By the way, does the sentence below sound natural (in whatever common contexts such as personal health or fixing a vehicle)?

The situation has gotten worse since [the last accident/that meeting].

In any case, if you cannot decide but you know of a specific scenario where any of the above could be used, then please write away.

  • Everything here looks fine to me! (I.e., natural, and not awkward.) – Nick Stauner Jan 16 '14 at 6:44
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    I would avoid using the word "gotten", at least when you're writing, since it's not very formal. It's mostly used in a casual conversation with a friend etc. – Frederik Popp Jan 16 '14 at 7:53
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    Somehow I think that using the present tense with your examples is also fine. For example, The situation keeps getting worse since .... – Damkerng T. Jan 16 '14 at 9:33
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    @FrederikPopp in American English "gotten" is the standard past participle of "get." I see nothing wrong or informal with "the situation has gotten worse" – hunter Jan 16 '14 at 11:49
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    As I read on a few boards, since takes 'has/have' to state that the situation has remained from that point of time. 'After' dose not. So, The situation has become worse since .... and The situation became worse after.... Agree with Frederik on 'gotten' as I see in Oxford. – Maulik V Jan 20 '14 at 7:03
2

Agree with snailplane.

Making it more clarified, as I read on a few boards, since preferably takes 'has/have' to state that the situation has remained from that point of time. 'After' dose not.

So,

The situation has become worse since ...
and
The situation became worse after....

Agree with Frederik on 'gotten' as I see in Oxford.

This question's answer is close and may be useful.

  • I learned a new tip aside from looking for the answer to the question from the link: "so we’d say ‘They have lived happily ever since". – learner Jan 20 '14 at 8:33
  • @learner Yes, but your question does not refer to 'ever' that might bring some nuance. I tried to address your concern specifically. – Maulik V Jan 20 '14 at 8:35
  • I've always enjoyed reading Barry's answers but the thing is that he didn't give any references. I'd love to get some authoritative answers to this very question because all of the good answers here are not totally new to me. – learner Jan 20 '14 at 8:37
  • Sorry, maybe I should not have written "aside from". I meant I learned some new regardless of the question. My second post maybe clearer. – learner Jan 20 '14 at 8:40

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