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I came across this sentence while reading through a blog:

There are two major features never change on both 2007 and 2010 map.

The author is comparing the features of two maps, one dates back to 2007 and the other dates back to 2010.

I was wondering why he didn't write:

......on both 2007 and 2010 maps. (the plural form of "map")

Is it a typo? or it is something I'm not aware of it?

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    There is also a missing features that never change. It seems as if it's just poorly written. Jul 4, 2018 at 14:15

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There is also an error in the first part of the sentence. The sentence should commence with either:

These two major features never change...

or

There are two major features that never change...

If we accept you correction that we should replace 'map' with 'maps' there is still a problem. The use of 'both' then leads to some ambiguities, as 'both' may be referring to "a single map from both years" or "two maps each from both year" or "maps (of unknown number) from both years". In the first case we are talking about two maps, one map from each of 2007 and 2010. In the second case we are talking about four maps, two maps from each of 2007 and 2010. In the third case we are talking about at least four maps, ie maps from 2007 and maps from 2010.

If we assume that the first option is correct, we can remove the ambiguity by rewording the last part of the sentence to:

...on the map from 2007 and the map from 2010.

or

...on both the 2007 map and the 2010 map.

If we assume that the second option is correct, we can remove the ambiguity by rewording the last part of the sentence to:

...on two maps from both 2007 and 2010

If we assume that the third option is correct, we can remove the ambiguity by rewording the last part of the sentence to:

....on the maps from 2007 and the maps from 2010

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