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  1. By making such fiscal investment, we will be able to leave a valuable asset to our future generations
  2. By making such fiscal investment, we will be able to leave a valuable asset for our future generations

If I want to say pass on/bequeath a precious asset to incoming generations, which prepsition should I opt for?

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This isn't a "gerund/infinitive" choice, but a choice of meaning. "To" means "in the direction of" and "for" means "so it can be used by". Both meanings are reasonable, and both prepositions can be used. So choose which one fits your purpose more closely. The expression "Leave something to someone" is the common expression used to describe bequests.

It is really up to you. "Leave to" is the common expression used for bequests, but "for" is good when you want to mention or imply a purpose:

I'm leaving my jewellery to my granddaughter. (Focus on who gets it)

I'm leaving my jewellery for my granddaughter to wear on her wedding day. (focus on intended use)

  • So here "leave for" seems better, right? Because it implies the asset can be used by our children and children's children. The asset is useful, not just something for them to store for no good purposes. Am I right? @James K – Mike Philip Dec 30 '18 at 10:10

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