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The cooks are not allowed to decide the amount of salt to be included in the dishes, as the proportion is fixed to maintain the quality of the flavor.

As is a conjunction, so the entire sentence that follows "as" is an adverb clause that modifies the main clause " The cooks ... included in the dishes".

Is my knowledge correct?

And "to maintain the quality of the flavor" is the infinitive used as an adverb to modify the phrase "is fixed" or is the infinitive used as a complement for the passive verb "fixed"?

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The cooks are not allowed to decide the amount of salt to be included in the dishes, as the proportion is fixed to maintain the quality of the flavor.

Unlike in much traditional grammar, "as" is best treated here not as a conjunction but as a preposition with a declarative content clause as complement.

The expression "as the proportion is fixed to maintain the quality of the flavour" is thus a PP headed by "as" with the clause "the proportion is fixed to maintain the quality of the flavour" as its complement. The PP functions as a reason adjunct in clause structure.

The infinitival clause "to maintain the quality of the flavour" is not a complement but a purpose adjunct in clause structure (cf. "... as the proportion is fixed in order to maintain the quality of the flavor".

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"...as the proportion is fixed..." is an adverbial phrase of reason (or cause) modifying the main clause, whose principle verb is "are". The subject is the cooks, the verb is to be, and the object is "not allowed...". Unless you think of it as a negative passive construction, in which case the principle verb is "not allowed"; either way, it parses.

So, "The cooks are not allowed to decide the amount of salt to be included in the dishes" is the (rather complex) main clause. This is modified by the adverbial of reason, "as the proportion is fixed" which in itself is modified by the adverbial of purpose "to maintain the quality...".

Thus, the verb to which "to maintain the quality..." attaches is "is" - "the proportion is fixed" - and the verb to which "as the proportion..." attaches is either "are" or "allowed", depending on how you prefer to parse it.

I've known grammarians who insist that the principle verb in a passive is the one which could be considered auxiliary, rather than the one that really tells you what is happening, and those who insist on the opposite. I suspect it's a difference in philosophy or something. I know that from a machine-parsing perspective, the "are" would be the principle verb, because that's where the clause first decomposes. Some people would also treat "allowed" as an adjective rather than a verb here, simply because it's so rare to see it in active form, as compared to passive form.

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