0

Is it the same to say 'with neither' or 'without both' or 'with miss' in this context? What part of speech is 'neither' here?

He had, in short, all the Byronic ennui with neither of the Byronic outlets: genius and adultery.

THE FRENCH LIEUTENANT’S WOMAN by John Fowles

0

Neither is a conjunction meaning 'not one or the other of two'. 'Without both' would be clumsy ('without' alone would work), and 'with miss' doesn't mean anything in English.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.