0

guys. I deeply apologize for deleting some questions number of times.

My next job would be definitely English related, so I have to get used to.

The question is,

Currently I am reading this article, and a paragraph says,

Dunedin, a small seaside city outside Tampa, cracks down on code violations, saddling homeowners with massive fines while its revenue grows. In 5½ years, the city has collected nearly $3.6 million in fines – sometimes tens of thousands at a time – for violating laws that prohibit grasses taller than 10 inches, recreational vehicles parked on streets at certain hours or sidings and bricks that don't match.

I checked at Yahoo Image! by googling by sidings. And somethings like these came up. enter image description here

So would this term, sidings, mean the line that separates the home itself and the ground on which the home itself stands, ( thus line ) probably?

Thank you for your continued support

0
1

I am only aware of two meanings of "siding":as a noun:

  • material attached to the outside of a building to make it weatherproof
  • a short stretch of railway track connected to a main line, used for storing rolling stock or to enable trains on the same line to pass

These are repeated with minor variants, in defs from vocabulary.com, Collins, Cambridge, and Merriam-Webster. Here I think it what is meant is the material on the outside of a house, but in US use this is pretty much never plural: "siding" not "sidings".

1
  • Sorry for being late I was a bit sleeping. The definitions you quoted are also found in my dictionary, but when you are not used to "objects" in another language, the best thing is probably to see. Anyhow thank you
    – user17814
    Jul 19 '19 at 23:48

You must log in to answer this question.