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Employments may differ in terms of how much the employee is supposed to work – part time or full time, right? But how do you refer to this phenomenon? Do you talk about "the extent of the employment" or "the work rate of the employment" or... what?

I want to say

The work rate of an adjunct position should be dictated by the requirements of the relevant institution.

but I'm not sure whether "work rate" is the correct word to use here, or whether it should be "extent" or something else entirely.

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  • I think "employments" is enough for describing such stuff. You need not add additional words/phrases with it. Nov 13 '20 at 9:56
  • For "work rate" are you looking for productivity? Or perhaps one asks "What are the/your hours?" Nov 13 '20 at 9:56
  • @DhanishthaGhosh uh... huh? When you specify the details of an employment it's not really to just state that it's an employment, right? Or do I misunderstand you?
    – Hannah
    Nov 13 '20 at 10:00
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    You give the hours, example "About 20 hours per week" or "Three days a week" or "Full time" etc. So you ask the employer "What are the hours?" Nov 13 '20 at 10:04
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    "The requirements of the institution should dictate whether the work (or position) is part-time or full-time." Or "The working-hours are entirely up to the employer!" Nov 13 '20 at 10:18
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The term "work rate" does not fit here. That generally refers to the rate at which work is completed, often in an assembly-line type of position. For example:

"The worker's union filed a grievance with management over the continued increase in the work rate demanded of employees."

Some suggestions of what you might use in this case are:

"The work schedule of an adjunct position should be dictated by the requirements of the relevant institution."

"The working hours of an adjunct position should be dictated by the requirements of the relevant institution."

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  • Thank you! Great suggestions!
    – Hannah
    Nov 14 '20 at 20:16

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