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I was taken in by this kind man into his home.

It's a made up sentence, but I was wondering if it was grammatical. I always thought that "taken in" meant the same thing as receiving someone in or let someone walk in. Is this the case?

Can it also mean taken in into something else than a home?

The man was taken in into a cave by the storm.

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  • A storm doesn't take someone into shelter, it drives them into it! Take in implies an invitation to enter. May 9, 2021 at 8:11

1 Answer 1

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The phrasal verb take in has 10 definitions in Collins.

1.PHRASAL VERB

If you take someone in, you allow them to stay in your house or your country, especially when they do not have anywhere to stay or are in trouble.

The monastery has taken in 26 refugees. [VERB PARTICLE noun]

  1. PHRASAL VERB

If you are taken in by someone or something, you are deceived by them, so that you get a false impression of them.

I married in my late teens and was taken in by his charm–which soon vanished. [be VERB-ed PARTICLE]

1.I was taken in by this kind man into his home.

2.The man was taken in into a cave by the storm.

Your example 1 is grammatical. As for determining the definition of this phrasal verb, context plays an important role. In your example, the context is clear enough.

Example 2 does not seem natural.

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  • Be aware that "I was taken in by this kind man into his home." usually implies that they gave you a place to live, or at least a place to stay for a night. It would be odd to use this phrase if they invited you over for a meal or a short period of time.
    – windblade
    May 9, 2021 at 7:09
  • Be aware also that take in doesn't require into as well! May 9, 2021 at 8:09

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