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I am again confused a little bit.

Here is some context and how I see it, so I'd be glad if you could clarify it:

1) "If a book is boring, many people prefer not to read it. If a book is also too long - the same thing happens."

My vision: If some unspecific book is boring, many people don't read it. If some unspecific book is not only boring but also long - the same thing happens. I think it is acceptable to say this as we talk generally however the version below might be more likely.

2) "If a book is boring many people prefer not to read it. If the book is also too long - the same thing happens."

My vision: here I add some more information about a general book introduced so "the book" is perfect.

The questions are:

  • Do I see it all correctly?

  • Are they both acceptable and correct?

  • Is the second version more likely?

Thanks.

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Number 2 makes it clear that you are talking about the same book when you say the book. To make it even clearer, you could also say the same book.

In Number 1 you could be talking about two different books. The second a book does not have to refer to the first a book. Even though you say "also", this does not necessarily mean you are talking about the same a book.

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    I'm curious which of the two versions is more likely. My guess is that it's natural to use it instead of "a/the book" in the second sentence. – CowperKettle Feb 2 '15 at 19:29
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    Yes, I also think so - then the problem is over. I found some examples similar to my first sentence on the internet so now I think they are both correct, but incline to believe that the second one is more likely here. – Nikolay Komolov Feb 2 '15 at 19:43

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