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Am I using which correctly when combining the following sentences?

  1. The usage of normal vector for searching plane objects is introduced.
  2. The method is formed by seeking points representing a plane from left to right.

The usage of normal vector for searching plane objects is introduced, which is formed by seeking points representing a plane from left to right.

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The usage of "which" in and of itself is probably fine, but it sounds weird to say a method is "formed". There are a few other awkward parts of your sentences too. You might want to rework your sentences as follows:

We introduce the use of a normal vector to search plane objects, which consists of seeking points representing a plane from left to right.

Or even better:

We can use a normal vector to search plane objects by seeking points representing a plane from left to right.

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  • Thank for correcting me. But further, can I write as it follows: An object searching method is introduced using normal vector analysis, which is formed by seeking points representing a plane from left to right. Sorry for asking this again.
    – aki
    Apr 29 '13 at 22:19
  • @aki But what is 'formed'? The sentence in this Comment says that analysis is formed; the first proposition in your Question says that a method is formed; the final sentence in your Question appears to say that usage is formed. Apr 29 '13 at 22:28
  • @stoneyB actually I want to say, " the method is introducd by using normat vector analysis" and in the 2nd sentence i want to say how to fromed in " this method is formed by....."
    – aki
    Apr 29 '13 at 22:47
  • So i want to know how to use which for combining these 2 ideas
    – aki
    Apr 29 '13 at 22:48
  • @aki: I'd shy away from using "formed". It's probably the wrong word to use in this situation.
    – Dan
    Apr 29 '13 at 22:51

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