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Where can I hyphenate (split at the end of the line; GB English) the words chargeabilities and chargeability? Merriam-Webster does not know the words at all and ushuaia hyphenates chargeab•il•it•ies, which is not in accordance with my pronunciation of the word, but possibly I got that wrong because I am no native speaker but an ELL.

  • From Wikipedia: "In some languages, the spoken syllables are also the basis of syllabification in writing. However, possibly due to the weak correspondence between sounds and letters in the spelling of modern English, written syllabification in English is based mostly on etymological or morphological instead of phonetic principles" – Damkerng T. Sep 29 '15 at 8:19
  • BTW, how did you get [chargeab•il•it•ies] on ushuaia? I think you might have chosen the wrong language, because the algorithm used by TeX is quite good, afaik. – Damkerng T. Sep 29 '15 at 8:31
  • @DamkerngT.: I chose "English (GB)", indeed "English (US)" gives charge•abil•i•ties, but I need to get it in UK-English. – Stephen Sep 29 '15 at 8:53
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As far as I know, we can split the word at any syllable split. So, in your case, you can split the word at any 'dot' mentioned in dictionaries.

Dictionary.com has an entry for this word. You may 'click' on 'syllable' or may look a bit down on the page where it's mentioned (under 'Related Forms').

Let's try it!

The following tables provides a very general guide to possible chargea-
bilities
of materials. One reason that in-situ chargeabilities tend to appear
lower than laboratory values is that large volumes of mixed materials are
involved in field measurements.

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    From Dictionary.com (thanks for the link!) I get charge·a·ble as well as /ˈtʃɑr dʒə bəl/, i.e. charge-a-ble vs. char-gea-ble, thus I am still confused. – Stephen Sep 29 '15 at 8:28
  • You did not look down - charge·a·bil·i·ty – Maulik V Sep 29 '15 at 8:37

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