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Is the following question grammatically correct? And if so, does it sound right/normal?

Do you know who would have been a great couple?

I'm wondering mostly about the usage of who and if it's correct to also use it in a plural context. According to the following question, seems like indeed it is correct:

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/122330/should-i-use-who-or-whom-when-the-subject-is-plural

But my question is mostly to native speakers, even if that's grammatically correct, does is sound natural? Would a native speaker phrase it that way? In some of the replies to the question in the link I posted above, some people even suggested rephrasing. Suggesting things like all of whom instead of simply whom. Could something similar be done to the question I'm quoting above? Or is it perfectly fine?

  • I'm OK with it. What would you want to say in place of "who"? – user3169 Mar 6 '16 at 3:12
  • @user3169, I would say, it would be the answer to the question, like; "Ana" and "John". Is that what you mean? Or do you mean like in the question itself? If so, I guess it could be something like: "Do you know (what two people or the two people that) would have been a great couple?" to replace the word "who". But I doubt that sounds right. – jpablobr Mar 6 '16 at 3:21
  • You can say "Do you know which two people would have been a great couple?", where you are just replacing "who" with what "who" refers to (two people). But I can't tell from your question if that is what you are looking for. – user3169 Mar 6 '16 at 3:29
  • Regarding the EL&U question you link to in your question, it's about a different sentence from yours. Compare: I don't know who(m) she picked and I know who said that. Note that I know whom said that is not good English. – Damkerng T. Mar 6 '16 at 3:36
  • @user3169 Thank you! But don't worry, you actually already answered my main question. Simply using "who" sounds right and natural. Knowing about different and correct ways to say it, it's just a bonus. – jpablobr Mar 6 '16 at 3:43
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My question is mostly to native speakers, even if that's grammatically correct, does is sound natural? Would a native speaker phrase it that way?

Yes. This sentence, especially when followed by two names (e.g. "Ana and John."), sounds perfectly natural to this native American English speaker. "Made" could also be used instead of "been" and that would be fine too.

  • It would be even more natural (in modern conversation) to drop the "Do". – WhatRoughBeast Mar 6 '16 at 22:32
  • @WhatRoughBeast That's also common, although the "do" is in those cases implied. – WBT Mar 7 '16 at 0:16

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