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I have used two sentences in a informal letter in IELTS exam - at the beginning and at the end of the letter. But I'm doubtful about that two sentences(below) because they are without a subject.

  1. Hope everything is going well with you. [at the start]
  2. Looking forward to see you soon. [at the end]

I also have another doubt about the second sentence. Should it be:

Looking forward to see you, Or looking forward to seeing you

Can you please tell me if those two are acceptable in an informal letter?

  • Is "Hope everything in going well with you" correct, or was that supposed to be "Hope everything is going well with you? That's the only thing that doesn't make much sense in your question. – Noir Antares Aug 1 '16 at 2:25
  • @NoirAntares Thanks for pointing that. It supposed to be "is"; careless typing mistake, sorry about that. So do you think both the sentences are acceptable. – Johna Aug 1 '16 at 3:23
  • Good to know, I'll put up my answer in a while. – Noir Antares Aug 1 '16 at 3:27
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  1. Hope everything is going well with you. [at the start]
  2. Looking forward to see you soon. [at the end]

The (1) sentence is completely fine. It is called conversational deletion. Some examples:

(Have you) Seen any good movies lately?

(I will) See you later.

I would never use (2). Look forward to is an idiomatic phrase that must be followed by a noun or noun phrase. Examples:

I'm looking forward to meet meeting your parents.

I look forward to our next conversation.

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  1. Hope everything is going well with you. [at the start]
  2. Looking forward to see you soon. [at the end]

In an informal letter, using these sentences as beginning and ending sentences are very much acceptable as it is commonly used.

Looking forward to see you vs seeing you

Both to see and seeing are actually interchangeable in this case, it's just a matter of which sounds more natural. As infinitives (to see) and gerunds (seeing) can both be used as subjects or complements.

This question really explains it in better detail: How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive?

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