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I wrote:

However, this time they have access to the variables set by the child nodes and the data extracted from them.

Can I replace "have access" with "access". I myself think "have access" means that they can use or they can reach something if they want. They are allowed to use them, however maybe they don't use them. But, "access" means an action of finding or using something, then maybe I just can say "They can access" but not "They access".

How much my understanding of that is correct?

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Not sure if this is a full answer, but it's a bit more than a comment.

As a native speaker, I've always felt that you access something you have access to.

However, this time they have access to the variables set by the child nodes and the data extracted from them.

If you use "have access", then I would understand that they have the ability to access those variables and data - but don't necessarily have to use them.

If you use "access", then I would understand that they need to use those variables and data in order to do their work.

Perhaps a subtle difference, but that's how I would interpret it.

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  • Thank you, it is what I expected and mentioned in the question.
    – Ahmad
    Sep 19, 2016 at 14:13
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    I agree - it's quite possible to have access to something that you've never in fact accessed, but it's not possible to access something you don't have access to. Sep 19, 2016 at 15:59

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