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In my first language, we use a term to describe a space dedicated to people for doing some certain works in offices or public places. Especially, in the banks where each of these spaces are numbered and you should go to there based on your number taken when entering the bank.

For example, consider the image below.

enter image description here

As you see, there are four spaces in this picture, each of which is distinguished by a red one-digit number at the top. Also, each has a red LED display showing priority of the clients.


However, we also use this term extensively and this is not limited to the banks. For example, when referring to "public phone stations" and "ATM devices fronts" and any office with a similar system to the banks. I wonder how do you describe this space in English.


To make it simple, how would you instruct someone to go to a specific space? Would you say, for example,

If you want to close your account you should go to the slot number 3.

?

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    It's common to phrase it as asking people to go to "counter 3". But are you looking for something more generic than a counter, for example, or even a desk or other free-form area that simply has a number attached? – Lawrence Jun 23 '17 at 16:05
  • @Lawrence Thanks. Hmm, both are required! 0:-). I mean it can be with or without a number. However, that "counter 3" answers my question to a good extent. – Cardinal Jun 23 '17 at 16:13
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In the US, at least, this is referred to as a "desk" or "window", depending on whether you can sit down. Also sometimes "counter".

If you want to open an account, please take a seat at our account manager's desk and we'll get you started on the paperwork.

You can make your deposit with the teller at window three.

This works better if the employees are organized into defined (and numbered) windows. Otherwise they may direct you to "teller number three" or simply "the next open teller".

  • Thanks, It's a nice answer. Yes AmE is my preference. "window three" is interesting because if you translate it "word-by-word" to Persian then you will have almost a certifiable and understandable phrase. – Cardinal Jun 23 '17 at 16:24
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You would often use the name for the space together with the number attached to that space. For example, banks often have counters:

counter noun 1A long flat-topped fitment across which business is conducted in a shop or bank or refreshments are served in a cafeteria. ‘He told us that it had all begun when he used magnetic ink to encode his bank account number on the bottom line of a wad of blank deposit slips that banks provide at their counters.’ - ODO

In that case, you might say, "go to counter 3".

Here's an example:

"Please go to to counter 5... Please go to counter 3" came the pre-recorded messages as the queue shortened. - page 270, A Life of Snakes and Ladders, by P. Lanquai

If the spaces were identified as tables, you'd say to go to table 3. Likewise for other types of spaces.

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It's called a cubicle.

A small partitioned-off area of a room, for example one containing a shower or toilet, or a desk in an office.

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    "Cubicle" loosely fits the first sentence of the question ("In my first language, we use a term to describe a space dedicated to people for doing some certain works in offices or public places.") It doesn't work for the rest of the question, though ("there are four spaces in this picture, each of which is distinguished by a red one-digit number at the top. Also, each has a red LED display showing priority of the clients.") nor with the picture provided. – Adam Jun 23 '17 at 19:10

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