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Imagine a situation when a group of friends is standing on a train station platform and waiting for a train to come. They all know that the train will arrive in about one or two minutes and will stop for only one minute, after which it will leave. One of the friends really needs to use the bathroom. What would be a common way he would ask his friends here about whether he can still make a trip to the bathroom before the train arrives?

Do you guys think I still have time to go to the bathroom?

or

Do you guys think I will have enough time to have a trip to the bathroom?

or what?

  • I wouldn't try to expand on "go to the bathroom". – user3169 Sep 1 '18 at 5:37
  • @user3169 - What do you mean? Is it wrong to say "I want to go to the bathroom"? – brilliant Sep 3 '18 at 3:36
  • No, I meant that "go to the bathroom" is sufficient. "to have a trip to the bathroom" is incorrect. Possibly "take a trip to the bathroom", but we wouldn't call such an activity a trip. – user3169 Sep 3 '18 at 5:44
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Australian English - bathrooms are when you have a shower or a bath. In an informal situation (e.g. workmates, friends, or family) you would use loo, to make it more formal you could say toilet.

Do you think there's time to go to the loo?

Do you think there's enough time to go to the loo?

Do you think there's still time to go to the loo?

Do you think I've got time to go to the loo?

Do you think I've got enough time to go to the loo?

Do you think I've still got time to go to the loo?

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