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If the subject is an and-compound like "cat and dog", then some languages put the verb into the plural form:

The cat and the dog are hungry.

Other languages take the quantity of the last element in the and-compound:

The cat and the dog is hungry.

The cat and all dogs are hungry.

What's the rule in English?

I came across this sentence:

Component properties and logic maps directly into HTML attributes and the browser's event system.

suggesting the "quantity of the last element"-rule.

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    In general a subject with the form of a coordination of NPs linked by and takes a plural verb, as in "The cat and the dog are hungry" / "Mary and John are here". It doesn't matter whether the individual coordinates are singular or plural: the coordination as a whole denotes a set containing at least two members, and hence takes a plural verb. Singular override is possible where the subject is conceptualised as a single unit, e.g. "Eggs and bacon is my favourite breakfast". In your last example, are "components and logic" seen as a single unit? – BillJ Apr 29 '19 at 11:50
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    @BillJ Thx for the explanation. Yes, "components and logic" seem to be seen as as a single unit although there is no explicit grammar hint like a singular object in your example ("favourite breakfast"). – Min-Soo Pipefeet Apr 29 '19 at 11:58
  • Sometimes both are possible. e.g. "[Your laziness and your ineptitude] amazes/amaze me". – BillJ Apr 29 '19 at 12:07
  • @BillJ Your comment would make a good answer. – Katy Apr 29 '19 at 14:12
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The cat and the dog is / are hungry.

In general a subject with the form of a coordination of NPs linked by and takes a plural verb. It doesn't matter whether the individual coordinates are singular or plural: the coordination as a whole denotes a set containing at least two members, and hence takes a plural verb.

Singular override is possible, though, where the subject is conceptualised as a single unit, e.g. [Eggs and bacon] is my favourite breakfast.

In your last example, it seems the writer's choice of the singular verb "maps" means that "components and logic" was intended to be conceptualised as a single unit, though it may just be an error, of course -- who knows?

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