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What does refer the word 'to' at the end of the sentence?

  1. This is the school which I used to go to.
  2. This is the school which I used to go.

What's the difference between these two sentences, and which one is grammatically correct?

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This is the school which I used to go is not a valid sentence. You don't go school, you go to school.

Some people don't like to end a sentence with a preposition so, to be very formal and correct, you could say This is the school to which I used to go.

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  • "This is the school where I used to go." Isn't that grammatical? – Mari-Lou A Sep 28 '20 at 9:50
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    Yes, of course, but not which. – Kate Bunting Sep 28 '20 at 11:44
  • But my main point being that you said "You don't go school" the OP doesn't say that in their question. – Mari-Lou A Sep 28 '20 at 12:54
  • 'The school which I used to go' suggests that 'school' is the object of the verb 'go'. – Kate Bunting Sep 28 '20 at 13:13
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Omitting to at the end of the sentence makes the sentence hang. I guess it would help to dissect the sentence.

Think of the following as the base of the sentence:

This is the school which I used to ....

In the simple past tense, went to is used.

I went to this school.

In its simple present tense, went to would be go to. Append it to the "base" sentence, and you have:

This is the school which I used to ... go to.

Take this sentence for comparison:

This is the school I used to ... attend.

This might not be the most technical explanation, but I hope it helps.

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