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"Taking into account poverty is spread all over the world, to help mitigate its effects, rich countries should donate food."

Is the part in bold grammatically correct?

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  • This is not good for academic writings.Do organize it properly.
    – Sam
    Oct 28, 2023 at 16:41
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    Rich countries donate food to nations struck by calamities, but if this sentence is only an English exercise, and shouldn't be taken literally then let's focus our attention on it. What do you think might be ungrammatical or clumsy and why?
    – Mari-Lou A
    Oct 28, 2023 at 16:48
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    Rich nations should donate food to help mitigate worldwide poverty. Oct 28, 2023 at 20:09
  • There problems with the logic more than the words. If poverty is everwhere, then rich countries have it. Accordingly, they should feed their own own poor, not send it away. And what is a rich country, one where rich and poor think cheeseburgers are a regular food? Oct 28, 2023 at 23:32
  • It's not good to elide "that" from "poverty is spread all over the world", because it's a long clause and it's easy to misread it at first. Oct 29, 2023 at 15:58

2 Answers 2

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Yes, it is grammatically correct.

The phrase "poverty is spread all over the world" is a noun clause with "that" elided from the front. It's even clearer if you add "the fact that" in front:

"Taking into account (the fact) that poverty is spread all over the world, to help mitigate its effects, rich countries should donate food."

This noun clause is the direct object of "taking into account".

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'Taking into account' is a verb phrase. It would often be followed by a conjunction to link to the following clause. Your example would make most sense as a 'that' clause:

Taking into account that poverty is spread all over the world, to help mitigate its effects, rich countries should donate food.

Having said that, there's nothing 'wrong' with the sentence as it is... we don't always use conjunctions. 'Taking into account' means pretty much the same as the verb 'considering'. You'll find that is used with or without a conjunction. If you look up 'considering' and 'considering that' in Collins dictionary you'll see they both have virtually identical definitions and examples.

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