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I am working for a patent company and I encountered the text which is

constructed from conductive an electrode and a layer.

I think that the writer is trying to say that 'a conductive electrode and a conductive layer.'

But is it possible to put the words in the order of 'adjective+article+noun' in that kind of context where 'too~to' or 'so~a' kinds of grammar do not exist?

I mean, can you put an adjective before an indefinite/definite article when trying to modify more than two nouns with the same adjective?

  • 1
    like in the example? no... – Stephie Aug 24 '15 at 9:34
  • I'd probably use "..from a conductive pair -- an electrode and a layer." – Victor Bazarov Aug 24 '15 at 12:50
  • If you put a comma between Conductive and an then you are making a list, which is fine - but you alter your meaning considerably. – lurker Dec 27 '15 at 21:12
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Nope. Articles go first, always. This may be one of the rare instances where English is consistent.

I mean, can you put an adjective before an indefinite/definite article when trying to modify more than two nouns with the same adjective?

The right way to do that is this:

I looked at the blue car and boat.

Or using your example:

constructed from a conductive electrode and layer.

For clarity, don't be afraid to repeat the adjective and/or the article - they can be omitted if it's clear the adjective/article applies to both nouns. When in doubt, repeat them.

constructed from a conductive electrode and conductive layer

constructed from a conductive electrode and a conductive layer

Or you can use the word both:

constructed from both a conductive electrode and layer

  • I really appreciate your kind reply. It helped a lot. :) – user22519 Aug 26 '15 at 8:31
  • Adjective phrases also appear in predeterminer function, before an article. – snailcar Dec 28 '15 at 1:15

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