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Examples with I was hoping you would:

I was hoping you would notice.

I was hoping you would look into a phone scam that is happening.

I was hoping you would be open by this summer, but was wondering if the activities team offer beach volley because it was not listed as an activity.

Examples with I was hoping you would have:

I was hoping you would have been cool about it.

I was hoping you would have listed the Verus Iron Shield.

I found the following explanation that suggests that the correct usage is "I was hoping you would have": In English to utter a situation that might have happened in the past , but didn't. We use : would +have+past participle.

So, are both phrases grammatically correct? If so, why is "I was hoping you would" more common than "I was hoping you would have"? Does the same happen with " I was hoping you could" and "I was hoping you could have"?

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    I may be mistaken, but "I was hoping you would have been cool about it" looks ungrammatical to me, because "would have been cool about it" is part of a conditional contrsuction and we need to have an if-clause somewhere. Nov 19 '15 at 9:16
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    I think the difference as you pointed is that "would have done" is something that wasn't happened in the past, though you wished it to be happened. However, "would do" shows your wish at the moment of expressing this hope, but the thing could happen later or not.
    – Ahmad
    Nov 19 '15 at 10:00
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    Why were you freaking out? I was hoping you'd have been cool about it. (it passes, though there is some time-slop) Nov 19 '15 at 10:31
  • Why did you freak out? I wish you could have been cool about it. Nov 19 '15 at 10:37
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    I think "I was hoping you would have something to say about this." is actually a member of the first category. The verb phrase is "to have something to say", so "have" is not acting like an auxillary verb. Nov 19 '15 at 12:01
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I was hoping ~

When stated after the event has occurred/not occured, it implies something (slightly) expected and pleasent came true/ the opposite came true. The expectation doesn't have to be something you were 100% certain of, it could be more like 60% (I think it is possible, but I dont know for sure). Tone of voice and emphasis will tell you which way:

I was hoping he'd pick me... (he picked another person)

I was hoping you'd buy a large pizza... (they bought a small or medium)

A dissapointed voice means that the hope didnt happen. If any words are emphasized, they are the relevant part of the wish.

I was hoping you say that!

I was hoping he'd be here.

If the tone is happy, it means the wish came true.

Note that in the above, the statement was made after the event happened or the opposite happened. If stated before the event, then the speaker is expressing their desires. It can sometimes also be a request, but it feels a little demanding.

I was hoping you would take a look at my computer

A more polite version of all three of these is the "could" version.

Because "could" is a form of "can", it feels like the situation is responsible, not the people.

I was hoping he could make it to the party... (but he did not make it, maybe he was busy with work)

Just as before, the speaker is expressing dissapointment, but is explicitly not blaming anyone.

I was hoping you could eat with us (as they are all at dinner together)

This expresses joy, but makes it seem like they were doing you a favour. It's an indirect way to say thank you.

I was hoping you could help me with my homework

This is a polite request.

Anyways, for the non-requests versions, you can change the tense from simple present to present perfect (notice -> have noticed) and it means basically the same thing. But it adds the nuance that the wish coming true or not has some significance to the present.

I was hoping you would have been home (but since you are not, you will miss Game of Thrones)

I was hoping you'd have known the answer (and because you did, you were able to tell the answer to me, yay!)

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  • Thanks for your explanation. Just one more question, please, why do we use "would+verb" and not just the simple past tense as in "I was hoping you noticed"?
    – Luke
    Nov 20 '15 at 12:38
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First of all, a quick comment about the examples.

I was hoping you would have something to say about this.
I was hoping you would have been cool about it.
I was hoping you would have listed the Verus Iron Shield.

The first of these is not an example of the thing you are asking about.

I was hoping you would have something

Here, have is not being used to modify the tense of another verb. The statement is actually about the act of having a thing. The infinitive of the verb is to have.

In the other two examples, have is being used to modify the tense of another verb.

I was hoping you would have been cool about it.

The verb is to be [cool]. And the use of have is used to set the tense.

I was hoping you would have listed the Verus Iron Shield.

The verb is to list, and against have is being used to modify the tense.

I was hoping you would notice.
I was hoping you would have noticed.

These are both grammatically correct. But they are both different tenses of the verb to hope, and so they have different meanings. (i.e. the syntax of each is correct, but their semantics differ).

The first example, "I was hoping you would notice", is often spoken to someone at the moment they inform you that they have noticed. For instance, if you arrived from the hairdressers with a lovely new style, and your friend said "Ooh, I see you've had your hair done.", you might reply "I was hoping you would notice." I began hoping in the past, and I was still hoping right up until now. All that time, my hope was that you would notice it at some point in the future.

The second example, "I was hoping you would have noticed", I began hoping in the past, and have continued to hope up until the present. But my hope was that you would have noticed, i.e. in the time leading up until this moment, my hope was that you would have noticed before now, at sometime in the past.

More concisely:
In the past, my hope was for you to notice in the future.
as opposed to
In the past, my hope was for you to notice before now, but the time for noticing has passed.

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