2
  1. I would love you till the sun died.

  2. I would love you till the sun dies.

Are both of them grammatically correct? Is there a difference in their meaning?

2
  • Both work and invoke the subjunctive mood in different tenses, the past and the present. – Alejandro Dec 27 '15 at 20:58
  • 3
    @Varun the tags "grammar" and "meaning" are considered "bad tags" and probably should not be added to this question. Please be careful about adding them to future questions. – M.A.R. Dec 30 '15 at 8:41
-2

"I would love you till the sun dies." - incorrect - impossible tense combination,

"I will love you till the sun dies." - correct - first conditional sentence - the speaker at least appears to be saying that this is a real possibility - an example of hyperbole!

"I would love you till the sun died." -correct - second conditional sentence following the normal rules for the second conditional

This question came back: Would love is present conditional. Why wouldn't it be compatible with dies?

Let's analyse when the sun dies by substituting another expression. We know the sun will die one day so we are, in effect, stating a time like any other. So an equivalent substitution would be:

I would love you until 6 o'clock.

It is clearly incomplete. Let's think of a way of completing it:

I would love you until 6 o'clock if you agreed (agree - see footnote) to pay my electricity bill.

So we could say:

I would love you until the sun dies if you agreed (agree - see footnote) to pay my electricity bill.

The conditional sentences in English are strictly logical and entirely consistent with other aspects of grammar. Don't fight them - go with them!

Footnote: I have dealt with these two possibilities in another post and will not repeat the explanation here.

1
  • 1
    would love is present conditional. Why wouldn't it be compatible with dies? – Alejandro Dec 30 '15 at 12:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.