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When I want to ask my friends if they know the full name of one of our teachers, then what is the correct way to do so?

a) "Does someone of you know the full name of our chemistry teacher"

b) "Does some of you know the full name of our chemistry teacher"

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You use someone in affirmative clauses and anyone in negative and interrogative clauses. This is a question, so you should use anyone. See this link for more information.

When you ask this question, you are expecting each person to consider their own situation, rather than have somebody answering on behalf of the whole group. So, rather than saying "Does some of you..", you ask "Does anyone...".

Does anyone know the full name of our chemistry teacher?

Note that some is plural, so your question b should have been "Do some of you.."

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  • Thank you for the answer. I appreciate it but I'm confused because you apparently said two different things. In the beginning you've said that I should use anybody but in the end you've said that I should use anyone. Mar 15 '17 at 18:07
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    @AdorableSpectacle My mistake. anyone and anybody are identical in meaning. I have updated the answer to make it consistent.
    – JavaLatte
    Mar 15 '17 at 18:10
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The correct way would be "Does anyone know the full name of our chemistry teacher?"

Another option might be "Do any of you know the full name of our chemistry teacher?" But that is more appropriate if you are face-to-face with a group of people. If you are on the internet, I'd use "Does anyone know the full name of our chemistry teacher?"

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