0

There are two objects having the same structure: an object A and an object B. When describing the structure of the objects A and B, I usually start describing as follows:

Since the objects A and B have the same structure, only the structure of the object A is described below for the sake of convenience.

I think this sentence is not sophisticated at all. Could you give me advice on how to start the description?

1

There is nothing substantially wrong, or even unsophisticated, about your original sentence. I would suggest that the reason you only describe the structure of object A is brevity, rather than convenience. Most people would consider that object A and object B are proper names, and so the definite articles are not necessary.

Since objects A and B have the same structure, only the structure of object A is described below for the sake of brevity.

0

I'm not sure what you meant by 'not sophisticated at all'. Please find below the possible reconstructions of the sentence:

  • Since both objects, A and B, share the same structure, I have described the structure of object A; as it has no visible variations from that of Object B.

  • Due to the fact that Object A and B have the same structure, here is the structure of object A, from which Object B has no variations at all.

  • Due to the fact that Object A and B have the same structure, a single depiction of either of the objects would suffice. Please find the structure of object A below.

  • "...Object A and B has the same structure..." Don't they have the same structure – Rompey Aug 2 '17 at 12:17
  • no visible variations... two identical boxes containing different things satisfy this criterion, but the internal structure could be completely different. – JavaLatte Aug 2 '17 at 12:28

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.