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I am looking for word(s) that can fit in the following example sentences.

We explained our situation to the security standing at the entrance. However, I think there is little chance they will ...... what we said to their supervisors.

The decision taken in the meeting will be ..... other employees through emails.

So I would like to looking for a formal word such as convey, transfer, transmit, relay that can be used in a context relating to information, problem, complain, decision etc. I am not sure which words fit and if there is any other words I can use as well.

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The phrasal verb passed along works in both cases:

There is little chance they will pass along what we said to their supervisors.

The decision taken in the meeting will be passed along to other employees through emails.

TFD defines the phrase as:

pass along (verb) transmit information : Please communicate this message to all employees; pass along the good news

I like this option because it's formal enough to be used in official reports, yet it doesn't sound overly formal or stilted.

Cambridge defines it this way:

pass something on/along to somebody (phrasal verb) to tell someone something that another person has told you : That's good news – I'll pass it on to the rest of the team.

Both of your examples fit within this definition also. In both cases, information is (or isn't, in the case of the security guards) being relayed further down a communication chain.

  • Additional definitions and examples for pass along can be found at this link. – J.R. Dec 29 '17 at 21:55
  • I like "pass along". I'm surprised I didn't think of that while I was writing that post. – Nick Dec 30 '17 at 1:12
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I'm absolutely confused as to what you want because you seem to know what words should or can be interposed into those sentences from what you've written above:

We explained our situation to the security standing at the entrance. However, I think there is little chance they will ...... what we said to their supervisors.

(they will convey; they will relay; they will relate)

If you were to reword the sentence, these verbs could be used:

...I think there is little chance they will ...... their supervisors (of/with) what we said. (If I put "with" in parentheses below, it does not take "of" after "supervisors"; it would most likely take "with" then.)

(they will inform; the will acquaint (with); they will apprise)

The decision taken in the meeting will be ..... other employees (through/via/by) email(s).

(will be conveyed to; will be transferred to; will be transmitted to; will be relayed to; will be related to; will be sent to)

The preposition "via" sounds better here, but this may just a stylistic choice, although I think most native speakers would use "via" or "by" in this situation. I also think that "email" should be singular unless the company should be trying to convey that more than one email will be sent to all of the employees regarding the decision taken in the meeting.

I hope this might have helped you out. Take care and good luck!

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I don't think there is any need for formal or fancy language to describe how information is transfered from one person to another in these two quite mundane situations. If you insist though, in the first example, you could use the expression deliver information/news to someone:

We explained our situation to the security guards standing at the entrance. However, I think there is little chance they will deliver that information to their supervisors.

Although in the second example you still could say will be delivered to the rest of our employees via email, the verb to send sounds like a more natural choice of words to use:

The decision made in the meeting will be sent to other employees via email.

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