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This question already has an answer here:

For instance, let’s take a look at the next conversation:

A) How many questions does the test have?

B) A hundred.

And the difference between the conversation above and this one:

A) How many questions does the test have?

B) One hundred.

Are both conversations correct? if not, which one is correct?

marked as duplicate by J.R. word-usage Jun 5 at 9:07

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They are both correct, and mean exactly the same thing.

I can certainly envisage situations where “one hundred” would be preferred; for example, in response to a question such as:

Q. Did Cruella de Ville steal one hundred and one Beagles, or two hundred and one?

A. One hundred. And it was Dalmatians you idiot, not Beagles.

Or, by contrast:

Q. How many press ups did you say you do every morning; was it a hundred, or a million?

A. Eh!? What do you think I am, a machine? It was a hundred. Obviously!

But even there, the “a” and “one” forms are pretty much interchangeable.

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