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Tell me please if I have to use some time after, some time afterward or some time later in the following context.

I bought a phone, but some time after/afterward/later, it starded to go haywire.

I feel that they are all correct, if my feeling doesn't fail me, then is there a different between the three? If there isn't any, which one is more common?

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They are all correct and they all mean the same, though 'afterward' is a rarely-seen version of the usual 'afterwards'. Perhaps you meant 'afterwards'. [I'm sure you meant 'started', not 'starded'.]

I think 'later' is the most common and 'afterwards' slightly less common. You don't need that second comma in either of these two sentences.

'After' is slightly different.

This --

I bought a phone, but some time after it started to go haywire.

-- means you only bought it after it went haywire!! So why did you buy it?! Even with your second comma it sounds a little ambiguous.

The problem is that we expect 'After' to be followed by something: 'after lunch, 'after 2.00', 'after you went out'. We tend to attach it to whatever comes after it.

Only by re-positioning the commas, or by using dashes --

I bought a phone but, some time after, it started to go haywire.
I bought a phone but - some time after - it started to go haywire.

-- does it make sense.

[Dashes are sometimes considered lazy, so let's use the commas.]

By the way, if it comes at the end of the sentence 'after' works perfectly:

I bought a phone, but it started to go haywire some time after.

So, from most common to least common:

1 I bought a phone, but some time later it started to go haywire.
2 I bought a phone, but some time afterwards it started to go haywire.
3 I bought a phone but, some time after, it started to go haywire.

1 and 2 should only have one comma. 3 must have two where I've put them

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