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You wanted your son to see this. That's why you did it to boast about your career and how prominent you were.

Is the above valid grammar?

The above was meant to say the following:

You did it to boast about your career and how prominent you were, and to have your son see this.

Not sure if this construction is valid grammar.

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2 Answers 2

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You wanted your son to see this. That's why you did it to boast about your career and how prominent you were.

The above is grammatical. Its 1st objective is to have your son see this; its 2nd, to boast about your career and how prominent you were. That's why suggests that the 1st objective is the main one. This example has a slight different meaning from that below.

You did it to boast about your career and how prominent you were, [sic] and to have your son see this.

The comma should not be there. It cannot be any of the four comma types, the listing comma, the joining comma, the gapping comma, or the bracketing comma. I think it was placed there to indicate a pause.

This example also has two objectives: . to boast about your career and how prominent you were

. to have your son see this

There is no indication that the 2nd objective is the main one.

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The first construction is correct.

Although the grammar is OK. The sentences are a little confusing. I can't figure out what "it" is is you did. Perhaps you were willing to accept some reward for your son's sake even though you had other reasons not to.

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  • Yeah, well, it doesn't mean anything in particular. I just tried to write a generic sentence.
    – Sayaman
    May 2, 2021 at 1:15
  • OK. But in the future, try to ask questions about particular things you are trying to say. It's hard to respond accurately to made up examples about an abstract grammatical ideas that puzzle you. May 2, 2021 at 11:38

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