0

Consider a situation where Jonh and Amanda (They are friends ) go to a restaurant. John has never been here with a girl before and Amanda has never been here with any male friends. Now John says" I have never been here with a girl". Then Amanda says" Nor have I been here with a boy". Is the sentence said by Amanda correct ?

  • That's perfectly idiomatic although so is the alternative neither have I been here with a boy.. – Ronald Sole Sep 14 '18 at 14:27
  • You will sometimes see a scene similar to this on some older movies, where the dialogue goes along the lines of, 'I have never been here with a girl'. With the rather ungrammatical response being, 'Nor have I. Ahh! Been here with a boy that is'. – James Sep 14 '18 at 15:57
  • Nor (and neither) require that there should be at least some degree of "parallelism" between the two (negated) elements being contrasted. So in John doesn't eat meat, nor does Amanda, the paralleled element is not eating meat (which is contextually implicit for Amanda, so it doesn't need to be explicitly repeated). That parallelism is more strained in John doesn't eat meat, nor does Amanda eat fish, and it breaks down completely with disconnected assertions: John doesn't eat meat, nor does Amanda drink vodka or John doesn't vote, nor does Amanda wear skirts. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Sep 14 '18 at 16:04
1

It is correct, although a bit formal sounding. Here in the US, the sentence "neither have I" is a very common response to "I have never..." statements.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.