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I am inclined to use the phrase "in during" to end some of my sentences. Here's an example:

I was headed to the library, and I've talked with my mom on the phone in during.

Does this phrase exist? Perhaps it is recently emerging? I cannot find it in any resource, so I'm afraid I might have just invented it.


It is usually possible to replace it with "on the way", especially when there is a verb for movement in the main sentence, be it explicit or implicit. However, take this other example where the subject is still, in which it feels like this "in during" suits better:

I was waiting for Judy in the lobby, and I've talked with my mom on the phone in during.

Of course, I can just rewrite the sentence and use "while" instead, but I really feel like using this phrase at some other times.

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    Hiya. Not an English expert in any way but I would like to share my opinion on the matter. "In during" sounds plainly wrong, what I would use instead is "while". In your first example: "I was headed to the library while talking to my mom on the phone." In your second example: "I was waiting for Judy in the lobby while talking to my mom on the phone." Also, this may not be part of your question but it's something I've recently learned was wrong to use. "I was headed" is infused with the perfect and imperfect aspects and is therefore confusing (check my profile for a question I recently asked). – Liron Ilayev Aug 27 at 12:02
  • @LironIlayev, I suggest posting your comment as the answer. As a native US English speaker I've never heard "in during". Your phrases are both correct. – Edward Barnard Aug 27 at 21:47
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    @EdwardBarnard I usually try to avoid posting an answer as I'm not a native, but I will take you up on that. – Liron Ilayev Aug 27 at 21:51
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    @LironIlayev - that's why I suggested. I wanted to confirm that you ARE correct. I would be hesitant in the same way if I were suggesting when I'm not a native speaker. You are being courteous, and that is a good thing :) – Edward Barnard Aug 27 at 21:55
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Not an English expert in any way but I would like to put my two cents in. "In during" sounds plainly wrong, what I would use instead is "while".

In your first example: "I was headed to the library while talking to my mom on the phone."

In your second example: "I was waiting for Judy in the lobby while talking to my mom on the phone."

Also, this may not be part of your question but it's something I've recently learned was wrong to use. "I was headed" is infused with the perfect and imperfect aspects and is therefore confusing; the reader will have trouble understanding whether the action happened or not. More on that is here.

  • Agreed. You could also reverse the sentence to change the emphasis: "I was talking to Mom on the phone while headed to the library" or "I was talking to Mom on the phone while waiting for Judy in the lobby." ("Mom" is her name; "my mom" describes the relationship; either might be correct here.) – Edward Barnard Aug 27 at 21:59

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