1

I am inside a crowd and he is outside the crowd.

What is the difference between "He made it through the crowd to me" and "He made his way through the crowd to me" in this context?

According to my study, "He made it through the crowd to me" sounds like he made a lot of effort and finally reached me.

While "He made his way through the crowd to me" sounds like he found a path through the crowd to me, without so much effort.

1
  • No. There is no difference in meaning. Both imply some difficulty. The first is simply using the pronoun "it" to refer to the journey, instead of "his way"
    – Billy Kerr
    Jun 14, 2022 at 13:11

2 Answers 2

3

That is correct. To make it to a place is to succeed in reaching that place, with the implication that the journey may have been difficult.

1

To 'make it' somewhere is to achieve an arrival at that place in spite of possible or actual difficulty or obstacles, or e.g. when there is a deadline -

He made it to me through the busy crowd, he made it to the bus station 5 minutes before the bus left.

To make one's way somewhere is simply to move or go to that place.

After we finished our drinks in the bar we made our way out into the street.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .