5

It's an accent feature. Look up the wine-whine merger Basically it means that some people, depending on their specific accent, still use the "hw" pronunciation, although in countries such as the US it seems to be diminishing. Most of the UK has undergone the merger, except for Scotland and Northern Ireland (and perhaps the Republic of Ireland, which isn't ...


3

It is important to remember that this is a Scottish name and as such has a different pronunciation to English as spoken in England. "Daniel" would be pronounced as you would expect. "Dunglas" would be said as "dung-glass" with full emphasis on the double-s as you would pronounce the word "glass" - not the short, clipped "lus" as some English names/words ...


2

Typically in American English, names are supposed to be pronounced according to their native pronunciation. So if 'Butlerof' is an alternative spelling of 'Butlerov,' it would be boot-lay-rov or boot-ler-rov. But that doesn't always happen. As a native American my first guess was 'but-ler-off.'


2

When humans are infants, they learn what phonemes are in their native language, and they learn to distinguish between them. If someone isn't exposed to different phonemes being distinguished at a young age, they may be unable to distinguish them at a later age. For a native speaker of English, "l" and "r" are clearly different, but apparently for people who ...


2

Wiktionary says 'll is pronounced /əl/, [əl], [l̩], [ɫ̩], [ʊ], [ɯ], i.e. phonemically it's /əl/ and phonetically it's one of [əl], [l̩], [ɫ̩], [ʊ], [ɯ] (possibly an incomplete list) depending on your variety of English. [əl] - schwa with "l" [l̩] - syllabic "l" [ɫ̩] - syllabic "dark l" [ʊ] - near-close back rounded vowel [ɯ] - close back unrounded vowel To ...


2

It's merely a difference in accent. Both pronunciations are acceptable. The former ("ih-mersion") would be received pronunciation (i.e. British English), the latter ("uh-mersion") would be commonly associated with certain American accents (it sounds Mid-west or Dixie). That's not completely comprehensive, to be honest. Both pronunciations are heard ...


1

Firstly, as a native speaker the line is clearly "Are you gonna go my way?". Often in songs, one syllable will correspond to one note. In this case, both "are you" and "gonna" correspond to one note each while having two syllables. This makes the singing twice as fast as the other words ("go my way"). "are you" is pronounced /ˈɑ.jə/ because the word "you" ...


1

I am a bit of a novice when it comes to IPA transcriptions, but I would tentatively suggest aju gənə - and as a native speaker, to be honest, Lenny's pronunciation here does not seem unusual, distorted, misleading or hard to discern at all. Playing around with Wikipedia's IPA vowel chart with audio, compared to my own accent his initial vowel is more open ...


1

Your question asks how to identify the right pronunciation, but your body asks about the reason why pronunciation varies. As for the latter, there are multiple explanations why, and they are probably beyond the scope of this site. As a short answer though, we might observe that "chord" comes from the Latin chorda whereas "chore" comes from Old English ...


1

I don't know why everyone is confusing the issue so much. In ordinary conversation, the indefinite article a is pronounced as an indeterminate vowel (the schwa ). I assume that's what you mean by ah. Occasionally, if you want to put stress on the indefinite article (perhaps to tell someone to use a and not the), you might pronounce it like the letter A (...


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