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Gripe -> /ɡraɪp/ Grape -> /ɡreɪp/ This is how they're pronounced in both General American English and Southern British English. Gripe -> [ɡɹʷaɪp̚] Grape -> [ɡɹʷeɪp̚] This is how I pronounce both the words (it's a detailed transcription). Grape has the same vowel as mate, fate, weight -> [eɪ] Gripe has the same vowel as might, fight, white -&...


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Pronunciation of foot or of feet does not change significantly when embedded in a sentence. However, the choice of word depends on context, e.g. It is a thousand-foot drop to the bottom of the cliff It is a thousand feet to the bottom of the cliff. In the first example, thousand-foot is used as an adjective, where it is regarded as a singular unit... as in ...


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Generally, words are pronounced to approximate the pronunciation in the original language. Often there is some modification to English phonemes and sometimes the words are more mangled. So "buk" would probably be pronounced the same as "book". Note that pronouncing u as [u] is well known in English, for example "put". Enen ...


2

I think of this as a cultural issue. Here in UK (where the legend originated) almost everyone says Robin HOOD. This is analogous with Judy DENCH, Peter PAN, etc. To me, ROBin Hood sounds strange and "American" (because I only hear it in US media and when I used to live there). I think this may be linked to general differences in stress patterns ...


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This is an interesting question, understandably from a native Japanese speaker. There are no gender markers in personal pronouns in English as in Japanese. English does not have a separate female speech style/women's language like the Japanese 女性語. In most romance languages nouns are gendered, but that is not the case in English either (English is a Germanic ...


1

It depends on the accent/dialect. If the dialect is rhotic, it means the /r/ is pronounced in all positions (pre-vocalically, intervocalically and post-vocalically). However, if the dialect is non-rhotic, it means the /r/ is only pronounced pre-vocalically (before a vowel). In Standard British English, the /r/ is only pronounced pre-vocalically. In General ...


1

It depends on which dialect the speakers use. In American English, a final /r/ is indeed pronounced. So in "another thing", the /r/ in pronounced, especially in careful speech (eg. television interview or news reporting). In British English, the /r/ is not pronounced.


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Your first link from the Cambridge Dictionary appears basically correct: comfortable adjective US /ˈkʌm.fɚ.t̬ə.bəl/ UK /ˈkʌm.fə.tə.bəl/ Note what this says, with the funny character "ɚ". Namely, the US version includes an "r" sound. Although not always since there are many regional dialects. Next, the Merriam Webster dictionary, "...


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A minimal pairs exercise might be helpful in learning to both hear the difference and then to produce it in your own speech. Listen to pronunciation of both words in each pair and try to hear the difference: fur/fair blur/blare purr/pair burr/bear her/hair lure/lair were/wear


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Yes, I see what you mean. I think what you're hearing is the aspiration of the "t". For example, in "two stews" /tʰu: stu:z/ the first "t" is aspirated and the second isn't. In your first linked example, it seems to me that the sound was recorded by the microphone in a way that emphasized sibilant and aspiration type sounds, ...


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