4

I am not aware of any generally accepted meaning for two dots. As you say, one dot is a period, which marks the end of a sentence or an abbreviation, and three dots is an ellipsis, which indicates that text has been omitted, or a long pause in speech. But two dots has no specific meaning. If you saw two dots somewhere, my guess is that it's a typo: The ...


2

There are several different ways of mentioning the three things. A direct parallel to the first example sentence in the question is actually different from the second example sentence: One thing is A, another is B, and the third is C. Alternatively, you can introduce the list items with a colon or dash: There are three things: A, B, and C. There are three ...


1

Rather than "independent clause" I'd describe these as two coordinated clauses: you have a good time with her everything is going according to your plans They are equal to each other and joined with the coordinating conjuction "and". A comma is correct, but I'd consider it optional, as both expressions are subordinate to the "I ...


1

[1] John slipped in front of the bank, [which was embarrassing]. [2] You have to write a thesis in the end, [which is a cumbersome and lengthy process]. It's not "which" that is the relative clause, but the whole bracketed elements. The relatives here are clearly non-restrictive; they simply provided non-integrated content that is not required to ...


1

If the job involves cleaning every day, I would call it a "cleaning job". "Job" in this case is similar to "occupation" or "regular employment". If by "job" you are referring to a single occasion, then "cleaning-up job" sounds just fine to me - written with a hyphen. It is an attributative noun, ...


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